Tri-County Quits: Tobacco Cessation

Tri-County QUITS Tobacco Cessation is here to help you quit smoking and become tobacco free.

We work with local healthcare providers and businesses to provide education, resources, support and assistance. We also provide nicotine replacement therapy to healthcare providers.

The Cessation Center also offers local stop-smoking classes, educational materials, and referrals.

What We Provide

  • Training, technical assistance and follow-up support to healthcare providers and organizations
  • Support and technical assistance to local employers on tobacco dependence, cessation and tobacco-free policy development
  • Monthly cessation programs throughout Oneida, Herkimer and Madison counties

Stop Smoking Classes

Fresh Start 

The American Cancer Society's Fresh Start Program is designed to help participants stop smoking by providing them with all of the essential information and strategies needed to direct their own efforts at stopping.

We offer a variety of classes at various locations each quarter. Click here for a schedule>

Call (315) 624-5639 to sign up or for more information.

Why should I quit?

  • Every day an estimated 1,200 Americans die from smoking. This is equivalent to two fully loaded jumbo jets crashing every day with no survivors.
  • Each year an estimated 443,000 people die prematurely from smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke, and another 8.6 million live with a serious illness caused by smoking.
  • Smoking in pregnancy accounts for an estimated 20 to 30 percent of low-birth weight babies, up to 14 percent of perterm deliveries, and some 10 percent of all infant deaths. Even apparently healthy, full-term babies of smokers have been found to be born with narrowed airways and reduced lung function.
  • More than 80 percent of adult smokers begin smoking before 18 years of age.
  • Children who smoke are 15 times more likely than non-smokers to go on to use narcotic drugs.
  • The cigarette is the single most common cause of fires; one third of home fire deaths result from smoking.
  • Every day, more than 3,000 adolescents under the age of 18 start smoking.
  • Smoking kills more than 443,000 Americans a year. This is more than the combined deaths from homicide, suicide, AIDS, automobile accidents, alcohol and drugs.
  • Cigarette smoking contains more than 7,000 chemicals; more than 30 are known to cause cancer. Smokers retain in their lungs more than 70% of the tar and nicotine they inhale.
  • Overall, about 22 million Americans use smokeless tobacco. It comes in three basic forms: chew, snuff and plug. Just like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco contains chemicals. More than two dozen of them are known to cause cancer. But unlike cigarettes, smokeless tobacco is in direct contact with the inside of your mouth. Holding smokeless tobacco in your mouth for 30 minutes exposes you to as much nicotine as four cigarettes.
  • Just like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco contains chemicals. More than two dozen of them are known to cause cancer. But unlike cigarettes, smokeless tobacco is in direct contact with the inside of your mouth. This may make smokeless tobacco even more addictive than cigarettes. That's because nicotine enters your bloodstream faster. Nicotine is the addictive substance in tobacco.
  • When you smoke or chew tobacco, you’re at risk of losing your cheek, your tongue, your teeth, or your jaw.  When you smoke or use smokeless tobacco, your risk of oral cancer goes through the roof.

Contact Us

Eileen Gleason CTTS, Tobacco Cessation Coordinator

Regional Cancer Center
Faxton St. Luke's Healthcare
(315) 624-5458
egleason@mvnhealth.com

Karin Vennero CTTS, Tobacco Cessation Specialist

Regional Cancer Center
Faxton St Luke's Healthcare
(315) 624-5639
kpiotrow@mvnhealth.com

Please visit us on Facebook

facebook.com/TriCountyCessation

Other Stop Smoking Resources

Our Members

  • Faxton St. Luke’s Healthcare
  • Oneida Healthcare
  • BRiDGES
  • Slocum-Dickson Medical Group
  • Rome Memorial Hospital
  • Mohawk Valley Heart Institute
  • Community Memorial Hospital